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GUEST EDITORIAL
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 12  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 1-2

Oral Medicine Achieves Specialty Recognition by the American Dental Association


University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

Date of Submission16-Mar-2020
Date of Acceptance18-Mar-2020
Date of Web Publication12-Jun-2020

Correspondence Address:
Eric Todd Stoopler
Professor of Oral Medicine, The American Academy of Oral Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jofs.jofs_40_20

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How to cite this article:
Stoopler ET. Oral Medicine Achieves Specialty Recognition by the American Dental Association. J Orofac Sci 2020;12:1-2

How to cite this URL:
Stoopler ET. Oral Medicine Achieves Specialty Recognition by the American Dental Association. J Orofac Sci [serial online] 2020 [cited 2020 Oct 20];12:1-2. Available from: https://www.jofs.in/text.asp?2020/12/1/1/286483





The discipline of oral medicine was first introduced in the U.S. in 1926 and The Academy of Oral Medicine (AAOM) was formally organized in 1945 under the leadership of Dr. Samuel Charles Miller, Chairman of Periodontology and Oral Medicine at New York University College of Dentistry.[1] Over the past 75 years, AAOM’s milestone achievements include: 1) establishment of the American Board of Oral Medicine (ABOM) in 1955,the examining board for oral medicine providers andframework architects for accredited training programs in oral medicine, 2) formation of the First World Workshop on Oral Medicine with AAOM support in 1988, with the most recent World Workshop (VII) held in Gothenburg, Sweden, in 2018 and 3) approval of oral medicine training programs in 2007by the Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA).[1] AAOM’s most recent accomplishment, and perhaps most significant, occurred in March 2020 when the American Dental Association’s (ADA) National Commission on Recognition of Dental Specialties and Certifying Boards reviewed and approved the AAOM’s application for specialty recognition and adopted a resolution recognizing oral medicine as a dental specialty.[2] Oral Medicine is now one of eleven ADA − recognized dental specialties in the U.S.[3]

What are the implications of specialty recognition for Oral Medicine in the U.S.? It willfurther substantiate the critical importance of oral medicine curricula in pre-doctoral dental programs, encourage incorporation of oral medicine curricula in medical education and promote interest in pursuing post-doctoral training in oral medicine. Currently, there are six CODA − approved oral medicine residency programs in the U.S.[4]; with increased interest, additional residency programs will develop to meet the growing need for oral medicine specialists. Oral medicine-related clinical, translational and basic science research can expand as specialty recognition will allow for increased funding opportunities to advance scientific knowledge and improve patient care.

Specialty recognition will also address the need for increased awareness and utilization of oral medicine clinical services by health care colleagues. In a recently published study focused on a single-center, hospital-based oral medicine practice, most patients had been previously evaluated by at least one health care provider (range of 1 to 4+) before referral to an oral medicine specialist for consultation.[5] Due to overall increasing life expectancy, the demand for oral medicine services will continue to expand due to several oral medicine-related conditions observed in an ageing population.[6] Increased awareness of the specialty of oral medicine, by both health care providers and patients, will lead to enhanced interprofessional healthcare opportunities and improved clinical outcomes.

As a cornerstone of dental education, research, clinical care and interprofessional collaboration, oral medicine has been an emerging specialty in the U.S. for more than half a century.[7] Now, it will be considered equal among all dental specialties in the U.S. with achievement of specialty recognition by the ADA.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Tyler MT, Miller CS, Lockhart PB, Patton LL. American Academy of Oral Medicine: 75 years of bringing medicine and dentistry back together. Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol 2020;129:91-4.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
National Commission on Recognition of Dental Specialties and Certifying Boards. Available at https://www.ada.org/en/ncrdscb/who-we-are/news-and-meetings; Accessed 06 March 2020.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
National Commission on Recognition of Dental Specialties and Certifying Boards. Available at https://www.ada.org/en/ncrdscb/dental-specialties/specialty-definitions; Accessed 06 March 2020.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Commission on Dental Accreditation. Available at https://www.ada.org/en/coda/find-a-program; Accessed 06 March 2020.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Villa A, Stock S, Aboalela A, Lerman MA, Woo SB, Sonis ST et al. Oral medicine referrals at a hospital-based practice in the United States. Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol 2015;119:423-9.  Back to cited text no. 5
    
6.
Yap T, McCullough M. Oral medicine and the ageing population. Aust Dent J 2015;60:44-53.  Back to cited text no. 6
    
7.
Sollecito TP, Rogers H, Prescott-Clements L, Felix DH, Kerr AR, Wray D et al. Oral medicine: defining an emerging specialty in the United States. J Dent Educ 2013;77:392-4.  Back to cited text no. 7
    




 

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