ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 7-13

Correlations between tomographic findings related to degenerative changes, condylar excursions and position, and pain symptomatology in temporomandibular disorders


1 Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Division of Radiology, School of Dentistry, University of São Paulo, Brazil
2 Department of Stomatology, Division of Radiology, School of Dentistry, University of São Paulo, Brazil

Correspondence Address:
Dr. João Gualberto Cerqueira Luz
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Dentistry, University of São Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227-Cidade Universitária, 02036-021 São Paulo, SP
Brazil
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jofs.jofs_89_17

Rights and Permissions

Aim: This study analyzed possible correlations between tomographic findings related to degenerative changes and condylar excursions and position with pain symptomatology in temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Materials and Methods: Sixty patients (40 women and 20 men; mean age: 37.9 years) with a diagnosis of TMD, according to the Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders, were evaluated. The data of their tomographic examinations were retrieved in relation to their degenerative changes, estimations of condylar excursion, and condylar position. Associations between the variables were analyzed using the chi-square test (P ≤ 0.050). Results: There was a predominance of myopain (M) (35% left side), which was followed by arthralgia plus disc displacement (ADD) (23% left side) and latter myopain plus arthralgia and disc displacement (MADD) (18% left side). Regarding the degenerative changes, there was the predominance of flattening (100%), which was followed by sclerosis (85%). The estimation of condylar excursion was more frequent in the hyperexcursion form, followed by the normoexcursion form, and the hypoexcursion form, all on both sides. The position of the condyle was predominantly posterior and less frequently anterior, and there were few cases in the equidistant position. Considering the sides independently, hyperexcursion and MADD were correlated to the left side. For the total sample, condylar hyperexcursion and ADD, and also sclerosis and MADD, were correlated. There was no correlation between condylar position and symptomatology. Conclusion: There was a correlation between hyperexcursion and symptomatology, especially articular, few correlations between degenerative changes and symptomatology, and no correlation between condylar position and symptomatology.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed227    
    Printed0    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded72    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal