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RADIOLOGY CORNER
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 5  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 74-76

Radiology series: Cone beam computed tomography: The fundamentals of image reconstruction and anatomy


Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, School of Dental Medicine, Robert Schattner Center, Philadelphia, PA, USA

Date of Web Publication20-Jun-2013

Correspondence Address:
Muralidhar Mupparapu
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, School of Dental Medicine, Robert Schattner Center, 240 S 40th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0975-8844.113712

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  Abstract 

This review is the first of series of CBCT. Multiplanar reconstructions for continuing education in three dimensional head and neck anatomy. This review gives the reader the needed anatomical references and clinical relevance for accurate interpretation of CBCT anatomy. The information is useful to all dental clinicians. All images are labeled and complete with legends. Only bone window settings are used for display of the CBCT images. The selected slices are displayed at a resolution of 300 micrometers.

Keywords: Cone beam computed tomography, radiology, 3D imaging


How to cite this article:
Mupparapu M. Radiology series: Cone beam computed tomography: The fundamentals of image reconstruction and anatomy. J Orofac Sci 2013;5:74-6

How to cite this URL:
Mupparapu M. Radiology series: Cone beam computed tomography: The fundamentals of image reconstruction and anatomy. J Orofac Sci [serial online] 2013 [cited 2020 Feb 26];5:74-6. Available from: http://www.jofs.in/text.asp?2013/5/1/74/113712


  Introduction Top


Although, all dental practitioners are quite familiar with the plain films (planar) both intraoral and extraoral, the introduction of 3D imaging in dentistry via the cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) resulted in better visualization of anatomic structures with the detail and precision needed for both localization and treatment of various maxillofacial conditions.

In order for the dental practitioner to begin the process of interpreting the volumes methodically, it is essential that the clinician familiarizes oneself with the fundamentals of 3D imaging and the basics of multiplanar reconstructions (MPR) via the CBCT. CBCT also known as cone beam computerized tomography (CT) is a dose sparing CT developed for the skeletal imaging of the maxillofacial structures. Although introduced in the market in late 90s, became quite popular after year 2000 and the dental profession saw a significant rise in the use of this technology by both general dental practitioners as well as dental specialists. A typical CBCT scanner uses a well collimated X-ray source producing a cone shaped beam of radiation. The scanner acquires sequential discrete planar projection images via a digital detector. This is accomplished by a circular motion of the x-ray tube around the patients' head. The series of 2D images thus produced are eventually reconstructed into a 3D volume via computer software [Figure 1],[Figure 2],[Figure 3],[Figure 4],[Figure 5],[Figure 6],[Figure 7] and [Figure 8]. This volume can be viewed via MPR (flat or curved) either slice by the slice or as a 3D Skull view. [Figure 1] shows the volume acquisition via cone beam CT and [Figure 3], [Figure 5] and [Figure 7] are sagittal, coronal and axial slices that correspond to sections in [Figure 2], [Figure 4] and [Figure 6]. The 3 fundamental views are: (a) Coronal [Figure 2], (b) axial [Figure 4] and (c) sagittal [Figure 6]. The MPRs can be also done via a curve for a panoramic reconstruction [Figure 8].
Figure 1: Schematic diagram

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Figure 2: Coronal view of head

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Figure 3: The sagittal section shows the appropriate tomographic plane that was displayed in Figure 2

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Figure 4: Axial view of head

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Figure 5: The coronal section shows the appropriate tomographic plane that was displayed in Figure 4

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Figure 6: Sagittal view of head and neck

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Figure 7: The axial section shows the appropriate tomographic plane that was displayed in Figure 6

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Figure 8: Panoramic reconstruction (curved multiplanar) of patients maxillofacial anatomy via CS 3D imaging software by Carestream®

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    Figures

  [Figure 1], [Figure 2], [Figure 3], [Figure 4], [Figure 5], [Figure 6], [Figure 7], [Figure 8]



 

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